Key Findings

This is a quick summary of the main discovery for each research paper we have published, organized issue by issue. Each key finding is below the article title, with a link to the abstract. 


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October 2016

Gender differences in the impact of population-level alcohol policy interventions: evidence synthesis of systematic reviews

Gender is poorly reported in systematic reviews of population-level interventions to reduce alcohol-related harm, hindering assessment of the effects of such policies on women versus men.

Link to Abstract

Evaluating the public health impacts of legalizing recreational cannabis use in the United States

Plausible effects of legalizing recreational cannabis use in the United States include substantially reducing the price of cannabis and increasing heavy use and some types of cannabis-related harm among existing users. In the longer term it may also increase the number of new users.

Link to Abstract

Smoking in movies and smoking initiation in adolescents: systematic review and meta-analysis

There are substantial associations between young people reporting having seen smoking imagery in films and smoking initiation, whether assessed cross-sectionally or prospectively. It is not clear whether the association is causal.

Link to Abstract

The burden of alcohol use disorders in US military veterans: results from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study

More than 40% of US military veterans have a lifetime history of alcohol use disorder, usually with a substantial comorbid psychiatric burden, including elevated rates of suicidal ideation and attempts.

Link to Abstract

European longitudinal study on the relationship between adolescents’ alcohol marketing exposure and alcohol use

Degree of adolescent exposure to alcohol marketing appears to be associated with subsequent amount of alcohol use.

Link to Abstract

Cognitive ability and risk for substance misuse in men: genetic and environmental correlations in a longitudinal nation-wide family study

Common genetic factors appear to explain the association between low cognitive ability and subsequent risk of substance misuse events among Swedish men.

Link to Abstract

Alcohol-attributed disease burden in four Nordic countries: a comparison using the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries and Risk Factors 2013 study

Finland and Denmark had a higher alcohol-attributed disease burden than Sweden and Norway from 1990–2013. Non-fatal conditions accounted for a higher proportion of disability-adjusted life years in Norway and Sweden than Finland and Denmark.

Link to Abstract

Parental alcohol-related disorders and school performance in 16-year-olds—a Swedish national cohort study

In Sweden, alcohol-related disorders in both mothers and fathers are associated with lower school performance in their children at age 15–16 years.

Link to Abstract

Epidemiology of illicit drug use disorders in Iran: prevalence, correlates, comorbidity and service utilization results from the Iranian Mental Health Survey

Opioid use disorders are the most common type of drug use disorders in Iran.

Link to Abstract

Alcohol and marijuana use trajectories in a diverse longitudinal sample of adolescents: examining use patterns from age 11 to 17 years

Greater alcohol and marijuana use is associated with worse functioning in high school for all youth.

Link to Abstract

From cannabis initiation to daily use: educational inequalities in consumption behaviours over three generations in France

In France, the risk of transition from cannabis initiation to daily use has remained consistently higher among less educated cannabis initiators over three generations.

Link to Abstract

The impact of codeine re-scheduling on misuse: a retrospective review of calls to Australia's largest poisons centre

Misuse of codeine combination products appears to be increasing in Australia. Limited rescheduling in 2010 failed to curb this increase.

Link to Abstract

Is attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder among men associated with initiation or escalation of substance use at 15-month follow-up? A longitudinal study involving young Swiss men

For men in their early 20s, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder is a risk factor for continued heavier use of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis and initiating use of cannabis, stimulants, hallucinogens and sedatives, independent of conduct disorder in early adolescence.

Link to Abstract