Key Findings

This is a quick summary of the main discovery for each research paper we have published, organized issue by issue. Each key finding is below the article title, with a link to the abstract. 


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October 2019

The prevalence of wholly attributable alcohol conditions in the United Kingdom hospital system: a systematic review, meta‐analysis and meta‐regression

An estimated one in 10 patients in the UK hospital system may be alcohol‐dependent.

Link to Abstract

Polygenic risk for alcohol misuse is moderated by romantic partnerships

Being in a romantic relationship may reduce the association between genetic predisposition and drinking, alcohol problems, and (for men only) high-risk drinking.

Link to Abstract

Mortality among people with regular or problematic use of amphetamines: a systematic review and meta‐analysis

People with regular or dependent amphetamine use are at elevated risk of dying from drug poisoning, homicide and suicide.

Link to Abstract

Prescription opioid use patterns, use disorder diagnoses and addiction treatment receipt after the 2014 Medicaid expansion in Oregon

Oregon residents who enrolled or re‐enrolled in Medicaid after coverage was expanded in 2014 were less likely than those already covered to receive opioids, use them chronically, or receive medication‐assisted treatment for opioid use disorder.

Link to Abstract

Age, period and cohort effects in frequent cannabis use among US students: 1991–2018

The prevalence of frequent cannabis use (FCU) increased from 1991 to 2018 among older adolescents in the United States.

Link to Abstract

Exogenous progesterone for smoking cessation in men and women: a pilot double‐blind, placebo‐controlled randomized clinical trial

Oral micronized progesterone may help women stop smoking.

Link to Abstract

Persistence of use of prescribed cannabinoid medicines in Manitoba, Canada: a population‐based cohort study

In Manitoba, Canada approximately 18% of people prescribed cannabinoid medication continue using for at least 1 year.

Link to Abstract

In their own words: language preferences of individuals who use heroin

Heroin users in early recovery vary in how they describe themselves and want to be described by others.

Link to Abstract

Effects of immediate versus gradual nicotine reduction in cigarettes on biomarkers of biological effects

It remains unclear whether abrupt switching to very low nicotine cigarettes leads to a short‐term reduction in biomarkers of tobacco‐related harm such as oxidative damage and inflammation.

Link to Abstract

Tobacco‐21 laws and young adult smoking: quasi‐experimental evidence

Increasing the legal age of sale of tobacco to 21 in the US appears to have reduced smoking prevalence among 18–20‐year‐olds who have ever tried cigarettes.

Link to Abstract

The ironic effects of stigmatizing smoking: combining stereotype threat theory with behavioral pharmacology

Media messages that elicit negative stereotypes of smokers promoted smoking among daily smokers in a lab setting.

Link to Abstract

Bidirectional associations between young adults’ reported exposure to e‐cigarette marketing and e‐cigarette use

Self‐reported exposure to electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) marketing was bidirectionally associated with ENDS use among young adult US college students.

Link to Abstract

Exposure to pictures of natural landscapes may reduce cigarette smoking

Exposing smokers to pictures of natural landscapes may lead to reduced smoking by lowering temporal discounting.

Link to Abstract

Negative marijuana‐related consequences among college students in five countries: measurement invariance of the Brief Marijuana Consequences Questionnaire

The Brief Marijuana Consequences Questionnaire appear to provide an accurate assessment of marijuana‐related negative consequences among college-age marijuana users.

Link to Abstract