Key Findings

This is a quick summary of the main discovery for each research paper we have published, organized issue by issue. Each key finding is below the article title, with a link to the abstract. 


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March 2019

The social location of harm from others’ drinking in 10 societies

While the places where people experience harm from other people’s drinking varies across societies, a common feature is that the people who experience most harm from others’ drinking are themselves risky drinkers.

Link to Abstract

Comparison of nicotine exposure during pregnancy when smoking and abstinent with nicotine replacement therapy: systematic review and meta‐analysis

Pregnant women who use nicotine replacement therapy instead of smoking reduce their nicotine exposure.

Link to Abstract

The interactive effects of perceived peer drinking and personality profiles on adolescent drinking: a prospective cohort study

Anxiety sensitivity appears to be predictive of not drinking alcohol in adolescents who believe their peers are drinking.

Link to Abstract

Alcohol consumption and diabetes risk in a Chinese population: a Mendelian randomization analysis

Among men in China, higher alcohol intake appears to be causally associated with increased diabetes risk, even for moderate drinkers.

Link to Abstract

Characteristics and prescribing practices of clinicians recently waivered to prescribe buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid use disorder

US clinicians recently waivered to prescribe buprenorphine for opioid use disorder treatment appear to prescribe well below their patient limit, and many do not prescribe at all.

Link to Abstract

Estimating alcohol‐attributable fractions for injuries based on data from emergency department and observational studies: a comparison of two methods

Estimates of the fraction of alcohol-attributable deaths caused by injury (emergency department data and population method) can differ widely according to the method used.

Link to Abstract

Test uptake and hepatitis C prevalence in 5483 Danish people in drug use treatment from 1996 to 2015: a registry‐based cohort study

Among Danish people in treatment for drug use from 1996 to 2015, those receiving opiate substitution therapy were most likely to be tested for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Because opiate use is now declining, HCV test strategies need to change.

Link to Abstract

Disentangling longitudinal relations between youth cannabis use, peer cannabis use, and conduct problems: developmental cascading links to cannabis use disorder

Cannabis use in adolescence does not appear to predict subsequent conduct problems or association with cannabis‐using peers.

Link to Abstract

An analysis of issues in the classification and reporting of heroin‐related deaths

In Victoria, Australia in 2012 and 2013, heroin‐related deaths were under‐reported by 32% compared with numbers from the Australian Bureau of Statistics and Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Link to Abstract

Pricing of tobacco products during, and after, the introduction of standardized packaging: an observational study of retail price data from independent and convenience (small) retailers in the United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, the introduction of plain tobacco packaging appears to have led to an increase in the price of leading cigarette brands.

Link to Abstract

Progressive nicotine patch dosing prior to quitting smoking: feasibility, safety and effects during the pre‐quit and post‐quit periods

Most smokers seeking help to quit seem able to tolerate transdermal nicotine patch doses up to 84 mg/day during a 4‐week pre‐quit up‐titration period with minimal side effects.

Link to Abstract

Concordance between the diagnostic guidelines for alcohol and cannabis use disorders in the draft ICD‐11 and other classification systems: analysis of data from the WHO's World Mental Health Surveys

The WHO’s proposed International Classification of Diseases, 11th edition (ICD‐11) classifications for substance use disorder diagnoses are highly consistent with ICD-10 and the DSM 4th edition but not with the DSM 5th edition.

Link to Abstract

Evaluating the cost-effectiveness of existing needle and syringe programmes in preventing hepatitis C transmission in people who inject drugs

Providing clean injecting equipment through needle and syringe programmes is a cost-effective way to prevent HCV transmission among people who inject drugs and could save millions of pounds in infection treatment costs in the UK.

Link to Abstract